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And We Have Yogurt!


So I ordered a yogurt maker about a week ago and I recieved it and made some yogurt. I’m starting with goat’s milk instead of cow’s milk for now. I hope the goat’s milk goes well or else I’ll have to do almond milk.

So it’s a pretty simple process. I buy a liter or two of goat’s milk from the store and yogurt starter which is just a bunch of fermenting bacteria powder in a little packet. I heated up the goat’s milk on the stove to 180F to kill any bacteria in the milk (which could compete with the fermenting bacteria and mess things up). Then I let it cool to room temperature. Then I add the yogurt starter and mix it thoroughly. I plug in the yogurt maker and dump all the milk + starter into it and leave it. 24 hours later I take it out and put it in the fridge (after sneaking a peek to see if it looked good – and it did!). 8 hours in the fridge and I took it out, stirred it up and did a little taste test…

It was good!

It was a bit tart because there was no added sugar or flavoring, but good. It was much thicker and creamier than I had expected which is nice. I will be adding honey, vanilla and berries for flavor soon. For now, I’m not going to bother since I’m starting with such a small amount of it anyways. My first dose was 1/8 tsp. I’ll be doubling that each day or so as long as I feel good with it. I’m hoping after a month or so to be up to 1 cup. Just gotta stay patient and not start it too fast. Reason I have to start slow is because there is so many probiotics in it (about 700 billion per cup) that it could upset my stomach if I consume too much without being used to it. Once I do work up to a large dose though, it should be very beneficial to my health. Definitely a medicine through food type of idea.

Kat

I have been following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet since January 2008 to recover from Celiac disease. As part of the diet, I don't eat grains, sugar or potatoes and prepare all my meals from scratch.

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